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LFG Betting Guide

Welcome to the LFG Betting guide, you can scroll down the page or click on the links below to browse the LFG Betting Guide.

LFG Betting Guide Topics

Click on the links below to read more of the LFG Betting Guide.

A Guide To Asian Handicap Betting

What is Asian Handicap Betting?

Asian handicap betting can be a great way to increase your profitability when it comes to football betting especially if the game you’re betting on is a tight one. One of the most frustrating things for a football gambler is to bet on an outsider and to see that outsider go 1-0 up early on in the match, only to see them pegged back to 1-1 or even lose two quick goals right at the end of the match.

You feel good because at the end of the day if you’ve bet on Burnley beating Chelsea in the FA Cup and for 89 minutes they were, then that proves that the cruel laughter you received from your mates as you told them about your bet, was totally unjustified. However whilst they might congratulate you on almost getting it right and tell you what a ‘good spot’ it was, the fact is the bookmaker isn’t going to pay out on your bet because you were almost right.

But with the Asian handicap in such a situation you could get your money back or even win regardless of whether Burnley win or not!

So, how does it work? Well let’s say Burnley are playing the blues at Stamford Bridge the Asian handicap might look like this:

Chelsea (-2) 1.75 Burnley (+2) 1.95 (this is known as a 2 handicap)

So Chelsea (-2) means that they start with a two goal deficit and the 1.75 refers to the odds (note even sites that represent odds fractionally will some times represent Asian handicap odds in decimal LINK.) so 1.75 means you win 175% of your stake i.e. £10 wagered on Chelsea will net you £17.50 if it wins and the same £10 staked will net you £19.50 on Burnley if they win, the (+2) next to Burnley indicates that they have a two goal advantage.

So if Burnley did go 1-0 up and then in the 88th and 90th minutes they conceded two goals to lose the match 2-1 then you would still win £19.50 from the £10 you staked on them as you would if Burnley managed to hold Chelsea to a draw. If Chelsea scored in the last minute of injury time to make it 3-1 then you would get your money back.

Of course if Burnley did go on to simply win then as any good punter you would start lamenting on why you didn’t just back them in the normal fashion because you would have got far greater odds on just the Burnley win, however if you HEDGE YOUR BET {LINK} then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

So in summary an Asian handicap is where each team in the bet gets a + or – goal difference before the match and the odds are scaled down because you can only bet on the win and not the draw. If you’re still a little confused then just see it as being up or down, if a team starts with -2 it simply means that as far as your bet is concerned they are starting the game 2-0 down so in order for you to win any money they must win the game by at least three clear goals i.e. 3-0, 4-1, 5-2 if they win by only two goals then you would get your money back and a draw or a loss means that you lose.

Below is a table with the different value Asian handicap odds, refer to this table when you’re placing an Asian handicap bet.

SINGLE HANDICAPS

Handicap 0:

You win if your selected team wins.

If it is a draw, you are returned your stake.

Handicap 1:

If you choose the (-1) handicapped team, the team must win by at least 2 clear goals (2-0, 3-1, 4-2 etc).

If it only wins by one goal (1-0, 2-1, 3-2) the stake is refunded.

If you select the opposition (+1) team you win if the team wins or draws the match. If it loses by one goal the stake is refunded

Handicap 1.5:

If you select the (-1.5) handicapped team you win if the team wins the match by at least 2 clear goals.

If they win by one goal you lose your bet. (unlike Handicap 1).

If you select the opposition (+1.5) team you win if the team wins or draws. You also win if it loses by one goal (unlike Handicap 1).

Handicap 2:

If you select the (-2) handicapped team you win if they win by at least 3 clear goals. If they win by two goals the stake is refunded. If they win by one goal you lose your bet.

If you select the (+2) handicapped team you win if the team wins or draws. You also win if they lose by one goal. If they lose by two goals your stake is refunded.

Handicap 2.5:

If you select the (-2.5) handicapped team you win if they win by three or more goals. If they win by two goals you lose your bet (unlike Handicap 2)

If you select the opposition (+2.5) team you win if the team wins or draws. You also win if the team loses the match by less than three goals.

DOUBLE HANDICAP

In double handicap betting the wager is split in two.

An example of a double bet handicap would be:

Southampton (-½,-1) 2.0 v Burnley(+½,+1) 4.1

In this example half of a £10 bet is placed on Southampton minus half a goal and the other half on Southampton minus 1 goal.

So in other words this is an each way bet on Southampton of £5 at -1 and £5 at -½ this means if the

score is 1-0 to Southampton my £5 at -½ wins at odds of 2.0 (£5×2=£10) therefore I will get £5 + my £5 stake back. My £5 at -1 has earned me my money back because Southampton’s goal cancelled out their minus one deficit, therefore my total net profit for this game would be £5

Below is a guide with the different value Double Asian handicap odds, refer to this guide when you’re placing a Double Asian handicap bet.

Double Handicap 0, 0.5 (also known as level half):

If you select the (0, -0.5) handicapped team you win if the team wins by at least one goal. If it draws you lose 50 per cent of the stake.

If you select the opposition (0, +0.5) team you win if the team wins the match. If it draws, half your stake is returned and half is a winner at the odds taken.

Double handicap 0.5, 1:

If you select the (-0.5, -1) handicapped team. You win if the team wins the match by at least two goals. If it wins by one goal, half your stake is returned and half is a winner at the odds taken. If it draws you lose the bet.

If you select the opposition (+0.5, +1) team you win if the team wins or draws the match. If it loses by one goal, you get half your stake back. If it loses by two goals or more you lose the bet.

Double handicap: 1, 1.5:

If you select the (-1, -1.5) handicapped team you win if the team wins the match by at least two goals. If it wins by one goal you get half your stake back.

If you select the opposition (+1, +1.5), you win if the team wins or draws the match. Also if it loses the match by one goal you get half your stake back and the other half is a winner at the odds taken.

Double handicap 1.5, 2:

If you select the (-1.5, 2) handicapped team, you win if the team wins the match by three or more goals. If your team wins by two goals, half your stake is returned and half is a winner at the odds taken. If your team win by one goal you lose the bet.

If you select the opposition (+1.5, +2) team, you win if the team wins or draws. You also win if the team loses by one goal. If it loses with a two goal difference, half your stake is returned and half your stake is lost. If it loses with a three goal difference you lose the bet.

Double handicap 2, 2.5:

If you select the (-2, -2.5) handicapped team, you win if the team wins the match by three or more goals. If your team wins by two goals you get half your stake back. If your team wins by one goal you lose the bet.

If you select the opposition (+2, +2.5) team, you win if the team wins or draws. You also win if the team loses by one goal. If it loses with a two goal difference, you get half your stake back and the other half is a winner at the odds taken.

LFG Betting Guide Topics

Click on the links below to read more of the LFG Betting Guide.

Betting Strategies

A betting strategy can be broken down into two main parts, Method and Type.

The Method can also be broken down into two parts; first how do you make your bets?
Are you going to use an online bookmaker or a high street bookmaker? Are you going to use many bookmakers or just one or two?

Secondly how you quantify your risk, or to put it another way what point system will you employ?

Most people don’t pay much attention to their method, but paying attention to how you put your bets on will help you keep track of your profit and loss and that in turn will make you a better gambler.

Type is the kind of bet or bets you place, for example; are you going to go for
odds on, low risk, high stake, low payout selections every week, or are you going to go for long odds high risk, high payouts? Will you back just one or two selections each week or will you back four or five? Will you back them as singles, and accumulators or singles doubles and trebles?

Again; as with method, most people don’t pay attention to what type of bet they’re putting on over the course of a season and will employ many different types from week to week, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but as with your method it’s best to keep an eye on your type of betting, adjusting Type is often the way out of a losing streak.

METHOD

We at Love Football Gambling prefer the multi-account online method, that is to say we bet through many different online accounts, we don’t rule out the high street altogether, but by and large you can get as many, if not more of a range of bets online and 99% of the time online prices will be better.

As far as point systems go we use the double liability 1 for 1 system. So in other words 100 points = £100, but £100 is twice what we’re prepared to lose on any one bet, so our maximum bet at any one time would be £50

Note: the point system is flexible and can change throughout the season, if it’s going well then the liability can change so that you’re betting more, or vice versa.

The benefits of the multi-account Method, is that it puts you in the best position to take advantage of the best price on any particular event. It also means that you’re more likely to spot ‘arb bets’ LINK (to betting terms) and best of all the more online accounts you have, the more free bets and promotional codes you’ll be exposed to.

TYPE

The variation of types of bet are endless, there are of course many ways you can place a bet and a variety of ways in which you can combine those ways, but we’re just going to concentrate on a few of them here.

First of all the two main types of betting are Fixed Odds Betting and Spread Betting, first let’s look at Fixed Odds

Fixed Odds

Fixed Odds Type One: Long term-safe singles
Fixed Odds Type Two: Short term-safe singles

These two types; as the names suggest, both rely on selecting mainly singles, the long term singles type is whereby you choose a couple of teams and then stick with them for a season or till serious loss of form.

Fixed Odds Type One: Long term-safe singles
For example Glasgow Celtic and Glasgow Rangers win a very high percentage of their games, therefore putting £10 on each of these teams for each of their games, unless they’re playing each other.

This strategy will see you yield a small profit over the course of a season, for instance Celtic who won the Scottish Premier League (SPL) in the 2007-2008 season, played 38 games winning 28 drawing 5 and losing 5.

Two of the games they lost were against Rangers, so therefore using the guide above you wouldn’t have bet on those games. Meaning out of 35 games you would have won 28 times or 80% of your games.

The average odds of these games is going to be very low say around 1/4 meaning for the £280 staked on the 28 games your return would be £400 a profit of £120.

For the eight games you lost that’s £80, so your total return for a £360 outlay on Celtic over the 2007-08 SPL season would be £400 a return of just over 11%.

This may not sound much, but how many banks will give you 11% interest on your savings over a year? Admittedly investing in Celtic is riskier than investing in a bank but you’d have to go back a long way to find a season where investing in Celtic didn’t get you some kind of positive return.

For Glasgow Rangers you would have had similar returns, they won one less than Celtic, losing one more, but of course two of those losses were against Celtic (they play each other four times in the Scottish Premier League).

Considering those two losses were right at the end of the season, you might have even decided to cut and run from the ‘Rangers fund’ at that point, Rangers would have been disheartened as Celtic were on red hot form and Rangers would have felt the title slipping away.

The point is over a season these two teams will rarely let you down over the course of the season making them good long term gambling investments.

Fixed Odds Type Two: Short term-safe singles
As the name suggests, this type is whereby you choose safe singles on a week to week basis, paying more attention to runs of good form.

For example you might see that Reading are playing particularly well at home, but not so well away and that when it comes to mid to lower table teams, they’re really blowing their opponents away.

In that scenario you would obviously pay close attention to their home games, backing them till their form turned for the worse.

The disadvantage of this type over the long term-safe single type is that form can end at any time so you’re more likely to get burnt.

The advantage of backing teams that have just hit a run of form; especially if they’re only doing it at home, or even better away, is that the bookies are sometimes slow on the uptake and you end up getting a good positive odds bet, when really you should be getting evens or less.

Fixed Odds Type three: (mixed type) short term-safe singles/doubles
Fixed Odds Type four: (mixed type) random singles/doubles

These two types both take more money to back but will yield a higher return, but of course the risk increases.

Fixed Odds Type three: Mixed Type (short term-safe singles/doubles)
This type as the name suggests is whereby you make single bets at the same time combining them to make doubles.

The simplest example being picking two selections, say Everton and MK Dons, first you’d cover them as singles, hopefully the way the odds are set means that if one loses and one wins, then depending on which you either make a small profit or cover your bet.

Then you combine the two into a double bet, thus giving you an even greater profit if they both win, this is obviously a good tactic if you believe you have two very strong picks for that week.

As a general rule (though always remember rules are made to be broken!) you would put half the stake of the single on the double.

Below is a classic scenario,

Everton are on red hot form and are playing a newly promoted Sheffield United who are struggling, MK Dons you believe is a good spot, they’ve drawn their last two games 2-2 and 3-3, but they’ve just got their star defender back so the odds are favourable, so you decide to go £15.50 on Everton at 10/11 £10 on MK Dons at 13/10 and £5 on Everton & MK Dons.

The disadvantage of this is if you’re ‘banker’ loses, i.e. Everton get turned over by Sheffield United but MK Dons still win, you lose money, whereas if you had backed them as singles you would still have come out on top.

However should your banker win, let’s pretend it’s an early Saturday 12 noon kick off, then you’d be able to sit back and relax, knowing that you were definitely up, if the Dons lose, then hey, you’re up £4.50, but if they win you’ve made an extra £16.50 from the double bet.

This type does not have to be restricted to just two selections, you might find in a week as we often do, that out of the 46 or so in the English Football League and the 21 or so games in the Scottish Football League, you may discover 5 or 6 strong singles, which you decide to combine in different ways.

Maybe you’ll make three doubles from the six selections or maybe you’ll make more, but of course the more you make, the more you risk something going wrong.

Fixed Odds Type four: (mixed type) random singles/doubles
This type relies more on good spots than the others, as the random element is trying to find good value bets or even upsets and then pairing them up with a strong single.

For example Bolton Wanderers are on a hot streak and are playing a struggling Portsmouth who’ve just had David James injured and are without four first teamers. But Scunthorpe who are topping their league had a bit of a wobble last week, they’re playing Ipswich who are at the bottom of the table but they’ve got a new manager and had a convincing draw last week putting an end to a seven match losing streak.

So in this scenario you would pair up Bolton and Ipswich and wouldn’t be hoping too much to get odds of around 4/7 on Bolton and 3/1 on Ipswich.

The final Fixed Odds types we’re going to look at are:

Fixed Odds Type Five: (mixed type) Short term-safe singles/accumulators.

Fixed Odds Type Six: (mixed type) Random singles/accumulators.

Fixed Odds Type Five: (mixed type) Short term-safe singles/accumulators
This type is whereby you pick as many ‘safe’ singles as you can and then mix them up into selections of doubles, trebles, four-folds, whatever you can basically, though if they really are ‘safe’ singles then the chances are that on any given week you won’t have more than two or three.

Fixed Odds Type Six: (mixed type) Random singles/accumulators
As with the Random singles/doubles, you’re relying much more on good spots and upsets, you may find that you have as many as ten selections, which you combine in a number of ways, though this type is the likeliest of the six to go horribly wrong, if it does go right, you’re gonna be in the money!

Important!

Remember 1: the more selections you have on a single bet, the less your stake should be, especially if you’re going for lots of different multi-selection bets.

Remember 2: the more multi-selection bets you have, the less singles will be covered and the more you’re going towards a complete accumulator type, which while still a valid type, will tend to win far, far less than the other more conservative types.

Spread betting types

Spread betting is a completely different type of betting to the types we’ve explained above, all the previous types depend on a definite outcome on a certain event.

Spread betting is where you’re betting on a range of outcomes, it is more fully explained in the Love Football Gambling betting guide, so for now let’s just look at ways spread betting can be employed.

Spread Type One: Long Term Spread.
The Long Term Spread is whereby you bet on a series of events over the course of days, weeks or even the whole season.

So for example Manchester United have won the Premiership for the last three years with 90,87 and 85 points, so a spread betting bookmaker like sportingindex.com might put the points spread to win the English Premiership at 85-88.

So you may believe that it’s going to be a really competitive season and thus low scoring so you may go £100 a point below 85, another way to express this would be to sell at 85. Or if you thought that one of the top four would run away with it you might go £100 a point above or buy at 88.

Unlike fixed odds betting it doesn’t matter who wins as long as they win by more or less than the spread, depending on which way you’ve gone. If you sell £100 at 85 and the final points total is 80, then you would win £500 or 5 x your stake, however if you’d bought £100 at 88, you would have lost £800 or 8 x your stake.

If the final points total is 91 then you would win if you’d bought £100 at 88 then you’d win 3 x your stake £300 but if you’d sold £100 at 85 you would have lost 6 x your stake £600.

Spread Type Two: Short Term Spread
The Short Term Spread, as the name suggests is taken over a short time, like the 90 minutes of a game of football or till the firs goal is scored or the first yellow card is handed out, there really are a myriad of different types of Short Term Spread.

For example yellow cards =10 points red cards=30 points.

Barcelona are playing Liverpool in the Champions League, both teams like to play football and both teams are low in bookings and sendings off for the season, so the bookie puts the spread at 20-30.

In this instance you might agree with the bookmaker and go £10 a point below by selling at 20 or you might see that Barcelona are playing a full back who’s been injured up till now and has a reputation as a tough tackler, so you go £10 a point above and buy at 30.

If it is a dirty game and there are bookings galore you’re quids in if you went above, and licking your wounds if you went below. The thing to remember with this tactic is that you can often pull out of the bet if it starts going wrong, therefore cutting your losses.

The Guaranteed Type

The guaranteed type! I hear you splutter, how can you possibly guarantee winning? Well it’s simple you only ever bet on arbs, arb betting is whereby you find a game in which three different bookies are offering wildly different prices on the three outcomes.

So for example: Rochdale are playing Darlington.

Bwin.com are offering 9/5 on Rochdale, 19/10 on the draw and 2/1 on Darlington
Bet365.com are offering 6/4 on Rochdale 7/2 on the draw and 9/4 on Darlington
http://www.lovefootballgambling.com/?page_id=209 are giving evens on Rochdale 9/4 the draw and 3/1 Darlington.

Note that they all believe that Rochdale are the favourites, where they differ is by how much, bwin.com clearly reckon the draw or they have taken a lot of money on the draw so are trying to tempt bets on Rochdale or Darlington (preferably Darlington).

Bet365.com also believe Rochdale are the slightly bigger favourites and don’t believe in a draw or haven’t taken much money on it.

At Betfair.com you’re betting against other people and so therefore have managed to get a whopping 3/1 on Darlington.

So you would put £10 on Rochdale with bwin.com, then you would put £6 on the draw at bet365.com and finally you would take the 3/1 you were getting at betfair.com, bringing your total outlay to £22.

Now if the favourites Rochdale win then you get back £28 a profit of £6, if it’s a you get back £33 a profit of £11 and if Darlington win you win back £24 a profit of £2.

Of course in arb bet you’re still rooting for a particular result, in this case the draw, however it doesn’t really matter as whatever happens you net a profit and of course you would hope that you would be able to put on much more than the original £22 as you simply couldn’t lose.

The disadvantage of this type is that these bets don’t come along for often, or in fact hang around for long when they do happen, odds are changing all the time, so you tend to have to be quick, and the amount of research to find bets like this can be colossal.

Of course it helps if you have taken the multi-account approach and if you let us do the research for you and check the LFG tips of the week every week to make sure that you’re not missing out on any potential arb bet gems.

If you want to find out more about how fixed odds or spread betting works, go to the Spread Betting Explained page.

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Betting Terms

Betting Parlance & Slang:

Accumulator – A bet consisting of two or more selections

An Arb bet – a bet that is placed with three or sometimes more bookmakers, this is done in order to get fluctating prices on a bet, insuring a positive return no matter what the outcome of the bet

Banker- A bet which comes in 90% of the time.

Bet Slip or Slip – The form in which you place your bet selections.

Bookie – a bookmaker either on the highstreet or online, someone you place bets with

Doing An ‘Arry- When a manager strenously denies that he’s about to move to another club and then moves to said club.

Doing A King Kev- When a manager quits because the pressure is too much.

Evens – a bet whereby your winnings are the same amount of your stake therefore doubling your stake.

Fixed Odds Betting – The traditional way to place a bet whereby you bet on a definite outcome, whose odds are determined at the time of placing the bet.

Gutted- Being extremely upset after losing a bet.

Going Long (sometimes known as buying) – a spread betting term meaning to predict the outcome will be more than the bookmaker’s prediction.

Going Short (sometimes known as selling) – a spread betting term meaning to predict the outcome will be less than the bookmaker’s prediction.

Hedging a bet – Covering another outcome on the same event when the odds are favourable, for example betting on Team A to win at 2/1 then taking a later price to bet against Team A at 2/1 or better. (This is usually possibly by betting in-play).

In-Play Betting – Placing bets whilst a game is taking place, the amount and type of bet will vary from bets done before the match.

Line- Another term for an Accumulator bet.

New Manageritis – When a team wins a game after a long winless streak, after hiring a new manager.

Odds – The method in which a bookmaker uses to calculate your potential winnings.

Old Strikeritis – When a striker goes back to the club that sold him and scores.

Odds On or Short Odds – odds that will give you winnings smaller than your original stake.

Over (Middlesbourghing) the pudding – betting on a team (in this case Middlesborough) too many times in a selection of accumulators. For instance doing 3 seperate lines of accumulators and betting on Middlesbourough in all three.

Robbed Off – Being denied a bet in the last minute (usually by the referee).

Reach For The Stars Line – A selection of bets that’s between fairly and extremely unlikely to happen, (this bet is usually accompanied by the singing of S Club 7′s hit ‘Reach For The Stars’.

Return – The total amount of money you get back from a bet.

Selection – An individual bet.

Spread Betting – A type of betting whereby instead of betting on a definite outcome you bet on a spread of outcomes.

Stake – The amount of money you initially put on a bet.

Winnings – The amount of profit you’ve made on a bet (Winnings = Return – Stake).

BET TYPES

Singles:

A Single is a bet on 1 selection in one event.

Scorecast:

A Scorecast is a bet predicting the scorer of the 1st goal and the correct score after 90 minutes in a football game.

Doubles:

A Double consists of 1 bet involving 2 selections in 2 different events. Both bets must be successful to get a return.

Trebles:

A Treble consists of 1 bet involving 3 selections in 3 different events. All 3 must be successful to get a return.

Four-Fold/Accumulator:

A Four-Fold/Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 4 selections in different events. All 4 must be successful to get a return.

Five-Fold/Accumulator:

A Five-Fold/Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 5 selections in different events. All 5 must be successful to get a return.

Six-Fold/Accumulator:

A Six-Fold/Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 6 selections in different events. All 6 must be successful to get a return.

Seven-Fold Accumulator:

A Seven-Fold Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 7 selections in different events. All 7 must be successful to get a return.

Eight-Fold Accumulator:

An Eight-Fold Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 8 selections in different events. All 8 must be successful to get a return.

Nine-Fold Accumulator:

A Nine-Fold Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 9 selections in different events. All 9 must be successful to get a return.

Ten-Fold Accumulator:

A Ten-Fold Accumulator consists of 1 bet involving 10 selections in different events. All 10 must be successful to get a return.

Multi-Bet Accumulators:

Now we come to a selection of multi-bet accumulators whereby you don’t have to get all of your selections correct to get a return, this is because your stake is split up by the same amount of bets you’re putting on.

So if we take the ‘Lucky 15′ for example you have to choose 4 different games. Let’s call them G1, G2, G3 and G4 if you put £15 pounds on a ‘Lucky 15′, then your stake is split up into 15 equal parts of £1, making 15 different bets. So you are putting 4x£1 on 4 singles G1, G2, G3, G4. Then you are putting 6x£1 on 6 different doubles G1-G2, G1-G3. G1-G4, G2-G3, G2-G4, G3-G4. Next you are putting 3x£1 on 3 different trebles; G1-G2-G3, G1-G2-G4, G2-G3-G4. And last but not least you are putting £1 on 1 four fold G1-G2-G3-G4.

So in a Lucky 15 where you chose Arsenal & Luton Town to win Chester City to draw and Manchester City to win, if Arsenal and Luton Town did win you would have 2 singles and a double so if Arsenal were evens you would win back £2 from that single if Luton were 2/1 you would win back £3, then you would have £1 going on the double so £1 @ evens = £2 going on to Luton @ 2/1 = £6, plus your £5 from the singles would make £11 return.

As a general rule 2 results will just about get your money back, 3 means you’ve made a small to medium profit, depending on the odds of each selection and all four and you’re in the money!

Now let’s take a look at a selection of multi-bet accumulators

Trixie:

A Trixie consists of 4 bets involving 3 selections in different events. The bet includes 3 doubles and 1 treble. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return. (This type of bet is more often used in greyhound and horse racing).

Patent:

A Patent consists of 7 bets involving 3 selections in different events. The bet includes a single on each selection, plus 3 doubles and 1 treble. Just one successful selection guarantees a return. (This type of bet is more often used in greyhound and horse racing).

Yankee:

A Yankee consists of 11 bets involving 4 selections in different events. The bet includes 6 doubles, 4 trebles, and an accumulator. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return. (This type of bet is more often used in greyhound and horse racing).

Lucky 15:

A Lucky 15 consists of 15 bets involving 4 selections in different events. The bet includes 4 singles, 6 doubles, 4 trebles, and 1 fourfold. If only one selection wins, as a consolation returns are paid to double the odds. If all four selections win, a bonus of 10% is added to total returns. For the bonus to apply, all selections must win (none void or non-runners). For each-way bets the consolation is paid only on the win part of the bet. Lucky 15 bets are accepted on horse racing and greyhounds only.

Canadian:

A Canadian (also known as a Super Yankee) consists of 26 bets involving 5 selections in different events. The bet includes 10 doubles, 10 trebles, 5 fourfolds plus an accumulator. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return.

Lucky 31:

A Lucky 31 consists of 31 bets involving 5 selections in different events. The bets include 5 singles, 10 doubles, 10 trebles, 5 fourfolds and an accumulator.

Heinz:

A Heinz consists of 57 bets involving 6 selections in different events. The bet includes 15 doubles, 20 trebles, 15 fourfolds, 6 fivefolds and an accumulator. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return.

Lucky 63:

A Lucky 63 consists of 63 bets involving 6 selections in different events. The bet includes 6 singles, 15 doubles, 20 trebles, 15 fourfolds, 6 fivefolds and an accumulator.

Super Heinz:

A Super Heinz consists of 120 bets involving 7 selections in different events. The bet includes 21 doubles, 35 trebles, 35 fourfolds, 21 fivefolds, 7 sixfolds and an accumulator. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return.

Goliath:

A Goliath consists of 247 bets involving 8 selections in different events. The bet includes 28 doubles, 56 trebles, 70 fourfolds, 56 fivefolds, 28 sixfolds, 8 sevenfolds and an accumulator. A minimum of 2 of your selections must be successful to get a return.

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Explaining Betting Exchanges

What Is A Betting Exchange?

When you open an account with a betting exchange such as betfair.com, it is not quite the same as opening an account with the usual online bookmakers that you come across, the types of bets as well as the nature of the betting is slightly different from the others.

PLACING A BET

Placing a bet on a betting exchange such as Betfair.com will technically be the same as placing a bet with any other online bookmaker though instead of the betting company giving you the odds on your bet, the odds received are from other punters like yourself, the main advantage to this is that the odds you’ll get will often be significantly better than the rest.

LAYING A BET

This is something that is unique to betting exchanges such as Betfair this is where you decide to bet on something not to happen, for example if you don’t think that Manchester United will win the English Premier League then you can ‘lay’ the bet. This simply means that you can bet on Manchester United NOT winning the Premiership.

“Ah!” I hear you say, “Isn’t that the same as just betting for another team to win the English Premier League?”

No it isn’t, because by laying the Manchester United bet, you don’t have to concern yourself with who actually wins the Premiership, as long as Manchester United don’t win, you’ve won your bet.

Betfair can be helpful when looking for arb bets, bets that guarantee a profit, find out more about these bets in betting strategies or take a look at this and other betfair techniques in betfair strategies

Offering Odds

All bets you take on betfair.com would have been offered to you by an individual, therefore you can also offer odds on betfair. This of course means that you become a bookmaker, but you’re not guaranteed any takers, especially if you offer unrealistic odds and iif you lose, how much, will be determined by your odds and how much was wagered.

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Explaining Odds

FRACTIONALODDS

Anytime you place a bet with a bookmaker you will receive ‘odds’ on that bet. Odds are important as they help you understand what kind of VALUE you’re getting.

For instance the likelihood of a coin toss being heads or tails is roughly 50/50 (we reserve a billionth of a percentage point for the coin landing on its edge). A bookmaker would call this an even chance. This might be displayed as; evens or 1/1 meaning if your bet wins you will win an even amount of money plus your stake back.

Example if I offer you evens on the toss of a coin and you put Example if I offer you evens on the toss of a coin and you put &pound10 on heads, if the coin lands on heads then I owe you £10 winnings plus your £10 stake back, doubling your money.

Note: if anyone ever offers you more than evens for a coin toss, they are either mad a cheat or a compulsive gambler, if they are the first or last thing, take their offer.10 on heads, if the coin lands on heads then I owe you £10 winnings plus your £10 stake back, doubling your money.

Note: if anyone ever offers you more than evens for a coin toss, they are either mad a cheat or a compulsive gambler, if they are the first or last thing, take their offer.

Evens or 1/1 is an example of neutral odds, as you win exactly the amount you put on, now let’s look at positive and negative odds.

POSITIVE ODDS

Positive odds are when your winnings are bigger than your original stake, positive odds are always represented by a larger number being on the left than the right for example:

10/1 when speaking these odds you will say; ‘ten to one’ but for the beginner it is probably easier to swap the word ‘to’ for the word ‘for’, ten for one. So in other words I will get back £10 for £1 staked plus my original £1 stake, making a return of £11.

Note: Remember your return and your winnings are two different things, your winnings are your profits, what you have on top of your original stake. Your return is your stake plus your winnings, this is important because when you place a bet some online bookmakers will show what your return will be and some your winnings.

NEGATIVE ODDS

Negative odds; more popularly reffered to as ‘odds on’, are when your winnings are smaller than your original stake, this can be a bit of a confusing concept for the new gambler, but as long as you remember that winnings and returns are two separate things, your return will ALWAYS be bigger than your original stake on a winning bet.

So if you place a bet at 1/10 (1 for 10) then this simply means that for every £10 staked you will receive £1 plus your stake back so now to gain a return of £11 I have to put on £10, if I put £1 on this then my return will be £1.10 my original stake plus one tenth.

Now let’s find out about decimal odds:

DECIMAL ODDS

Another way that odds are represented is in the decimal sense; these are sometimes called European odds. They are not as daunting as they at first seem, the thing to remember here is that you don’t have to add on your stake after to work out your total winnings.

For instance odds of 2 are the same as odds of evens, this is because the 2 represents the amount of times you multiply your stake by.

e.g. If I place a £10 bet on Arsenal at odds of 2 then if I win I will get back £20 because 10×2= 20.

REMINDER

When trying to calculate potential returns using fractional odds, always remember to add stake back on. i.e. £10 placed at 2/1 equals £20 winnings plus £10 stake back making a total return of £30.

When trying to calculate potential returns using decimal odds simply multiply your original stake by the number being offered, i.e. £10 placed at odds of 3 = 10×3= 30 making a return of £30.

Here is a little table with some often used odds converted to a decimal form, there are many online bookmakers who use a variety of fractional odds so there are too many to list here, but this should give you a quick reference guide.

Fractional to Decimal Odds Converter

FRACTIONAL DECIMAL RETURNFROM £10 STAKE
1/10 1.1 £11
1/5 1.2 £12
1/3 1.33 £13.33
1/2 1.5 £15
1/1 (evens) 2.0 £20
2/1 3.0 £30
9/4 3.25 £32.50
5/2 3.5 £35
3/1 4.0 £40
7/2 4.5 £45

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Explaining Value

You may have heard a football gambler say something like, “That’s a great value bet.” Or “I’m staying clear of that one, it’s terrible value.”

So what does value mean? Surely any bet that wins is great value isn’t it? Well yes, ultimately a winning bet is the best value of all because you’ve had a return greater than the amount of money you put in.

But seeing as nobody’s built a time machine capable of jumping forwards a couple of hours so that you can check out what the final score’s are and then back again, (please hurry up with that invention!) we have to try and work out what bets represent good value and what represents bad, I’ve put some examples below.

East Fife 1/3 DRAW 9/4 Alloa 11/8

If East Fife have won their last three games and are unbeaten in five, whilst Alloa haven’t won in five you might say that these odds are reflective of what’s likely to happen.

However when we look closer at the stats, we find that East Fife have been winning by the odd goal and Alloa have drawn three of their last five and don’t concede many on the road, we also see that their league positions are not separated by a great amount of points, add to that that this is the Scottish Second Division and East Fife begin to look terrible value at 1/3, because if they do win it will probably be by one goal and a one goal lead can always be cancelled out by a single piece of luck.

In other words you’ll have to put a large amount of money to get back a decent return and you’ll be sitting there sweating buckets, even if you do win the chances are you would have drunk your profits whilst waiting nervously for the bet to come in.

Alloa are also bad value, because they haven’t won in five and they’re away, their true odds should be closer to 2/1 say something like 9/5 or 17/10.

The draw is the best value with this bet (though draws are usually priced up at just over 2/1), but of course this does not mean that the game will be a draw, it just means that you get the chance to more than triple your stake and are getting better value than backing either team to win and given the records a draw isn’t that unlikely so you’re in a lose small win big situation, that’s value!

Republic Of Ireland 1/3 draw 5/2 Saudi Arabia 6/1

In this example you might think the Republic Of Ireland are terrible value, after all they’re no Brazil, however these represented the actual odds in a 2002 World Cup Finals group stage game. It was the third game and Ireland needed a win to get through to the knockout stages, whilst Saudi Arabia had been thrashed 8-0 in the first game and then managed to restore pride in the second by only losing 1-0, they were out of the tournament and playing for nothing.

In this case even though you have to lay out a big amount and your return is only 25% bigger than your stake, it is or rather was like printing money, for me it was like printing up a £50 note! (By the way Ireland won 3-1, but not before making me sweat for a while).

So in summary value is all about how likely something is versus the odds the bookmaker gives you, to work out value do your research or of course, let LFG do it for you!

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Spread Betting Explained

What is spread betting?

You may have heard the term spread betting before and wondered what it is and how it differs from the traditional form of betting, known as fixed odds betting

Well the first thing to know about spread betting is that unlike fixed odds betting which is regulated by the gaming commission, spread betting is regulated by the Financial Services Authority (FSA). That’s because spread betting is used as a form of financial trading in the city, you can spread bet on the perfomance of stocks and shares.

The second thing to remember about spread betting, is that the amount you can win or lose is determined by how right or how wrong you are.

We’re looking at fooball spread betting; football spread betting is a form of betting whereby the bookmaker decides on various aspecst of a football game or a season, or even topical subjects regarding football, like how long a manager might stay in a position.

How Do I Place A Spread Bet?

In a game against Arsenal v Everton the bookmaker may give a number of prices on a number of events in that game, first let’s look at the first goal market.

The bookmaker may decide that the spread for the first goal is 28-32 minutes, this simply means that the bookie believes that the first goal will be scored between the 28th and the 32nd minute.

There the betting slip would look something like this:

Arsenal v Everton First Goal SELL 28 BUY 32

In the example above if you choose SELL, this simply means you want to go short on 28 minutes, or in other words, you believe that there will be a goal before 28 minutes. If there is a goal in say the 15th minute, then you would win your bet, but your winnings are calculated by how right you are.

So if you had sold (gone short) the first goal at 28 and the goal came in the 15th minute, then you would have got 13 times your stake back, that’s because 28-15 = 13. So you were right by 13 minutes, if you had put £10 on it you would get back 10×13=130

However if you had bought at 32, then you’d be wrong by 17 minutes because 32-15 =17 so you would lose 17 times your stake so £10 x 17=£170 loss. In the same way if you had bought at 32 and the first goal didn’t come till the 45th minute then you would have won 13 times your stake back. If there was no goal at all, you’d win 58 times your stake back.

What Are The Risks Of Spread Betting, and How Do I Manage Them?

Because of the potentially large losses, spread betting has got a reputation for being risky, however as with all betting it is about managing your risk. If you can only afford to lose £10 on a particular bet, then with fixed odds betting, it’s simple you just put on a tenner on your bet.

However with spread betting then calculating your risk is about how wrong you could possibly be in a given event, let’s look at some examples

example one:

The game is Fulham v Benfica in the old UEFA Cup, now known as theEuropa Cup and the bookie is offering the following spread on the total number of goals in the game;

SELL 2 BUY 4

In the above example the bookmaker believe’s that there will be 2-4 goals in the match, you decide that your maximum loss for this bet should be £10. You know (because of LFG’s dilligent research) that the number of games in European football that have a total number of 8 goals is less than 5%

So armed with that knowledge you can make your bet, you believe that Fulham’s great home form will see them narrowly beat or draw with Benfica, you figure because of the tight defences of the two teams that it will be a low scoring game, maybe 0-0, 1-0, 1-1 or maybe even 2-1

So you decide to go short (sell) at 2, meaning you’re betting that it will be less than 2 goals in the entire 90 minutes. You know that an 8 goal game is highly unlikely, but in order to work out your stake, you envisage the worst case scenario, that it’s a cracking 8 goal thriller.

So if it does end up Fulham 4 Benfica 4 you would lose six times your stake, because 2 goals plus 6 goals = 8 goals (4-4)

You have already decided that £10 is your maximum loss, so you would only sell at £1.66, so the highest likely amount that you’ll lose is £10, of course in an infinitely evolving universe, anything can happen and a record breaking game could happen, it’s just very unlikely that there will be more than 8 goals so therefore you’ve managed your risks

The spread betting bookmaker will also allow you to put liability limits on your account and if you’re betting in-play, there will more often than not, be a way of pulling out of the bet should you see it going wrong early on and therefore cutting your losses.

example two:

In the next example we see that Leeds United are Playing Milwall FC the bookie is offering the following spread on the amount of yellow and red cards in the match

SELL 40 BUY 70

In the above example yellow cards = 10 points and red cards = 30 points, the bookmaker believes there will be between 40 and 70 points worth of yellow and red cards.

You decide that your maximum liability on this bet should be £50, in other words that’s all you’re prepared to lose on this bet.

You decide that despite their reputations off the pitch that these two teams won’t be as dirty as you think, you believe that there will be a maximum of 3 yellows, but how do you work out what your stake should be?

Well you know that if a team has four sendings off, reducing them to 7 players, the game is abandonded and the other team automatically wins 3-0, so the maximum amount of sendings off is 7, four from one side and three from the other.

The most point conceeding way a player can be sent off, is to be given a yellow (10 points) and then a straight red (30 points) making a total of 40 points, if this happened 7 times that would mean a points total of 40 x 7 =280

Therefore if you sold at 40 then the biggest possible loss you could incur would be 280 points – 40 = 240.

So if you wanted to guarantee that you wouldn’t lose more than £50 you would divide that by 240, making £0.20p

Of course the likelihood of 7 players getting sent off in this way is vanshingly small and you would probably work out your worst case scenario at closer to 120 points (3 sendings off via yellow cards and straight reds and four bookings).

Spread Betting Summary

Spread betting is regulated by the Financial Services Authority.
When spread betting you’re going ‘long’ or ‘short’ (buying or selling) a positiion.
How much you win or lose is dependent on how right or wrong you are.
When working out how much you can afford to lose, imagine the worst possible scenario and work out your stake from there.

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